OCT 1998: WARNING!! THIS IS AN HISTORIC SITE! Please write to linda@anamika.freeserve.co.uk for Scottish Cannabis Information thePulse, iN2SouND and all you see in this Domain were an early creation in the history of the web. We have not touched it for over 6 years. Many pages have not been touched since 1995. We will leave these pages as they are for ever.

News Graphic

March 1996 Cannabis News

11th March POW GRAEME STEEL RELEASED, TO CONTINUE CAMPAIGNING
18th March AUTHOR OF CANNABIS BOOK IMPRISONED
GULF VETERAN ESCAPES JAIL FOR “MINDING” CANNABIS


hemp!
Monday 11th March

POW GRAEME STEEL RELEASED, TO CONTINUE CAMPAIGNING

LCC Scotland co-ordinator Graeme Steel, has been released from Friarton Prison. He had served half of a nine month sentence for production of cannabis for his own personal use. In prison Graeme made friends with other cannabis growers, and continued campaigning. He wrote a Prison diary which caused a storm of protest when it was published on the Internet, and co-wrote a letter to the press with the other prisoners of the war. On the day of his release he appeared on Reporting Scotland where he slammed judges sentencing policy and vowed to continue campaigning.
His prison diary was serialised on the UKCIA world wide web site, and was to be published in the LCC Scotland newsletter. Unfortunately right-wing tabloids wanted to attack the reputation of his famous father, the former Liberal leader, Sir David Steel MP. The Mail on Sunday (Dec 10th) described the diaries as "propaganda" which was ironic, considering that they selectively quoted from the diaries to show prisoners and Graeme in the worst possible light, and prisons and warders in the best. Some of the quotes deeply upset the prison staff, and to placate the Governor, Graeme asked UKCIA to remove the diary.
hemp!
Monday 18th March

AUTHOR OF CANNABIS BOOK IMPRISONED

A Gloucestershire man has been sentenced to 12 months in prison for writing and publishing a grow guide. Mick Marlow is the author of 'Tricameral Sensimilla', which he published under the pseudonym, 'Maria Warner'. There are numerous similar books on sale, but Marlow didn’t include the customary disclaimer. Marlow believed claiming that detailed horticultural information was not intended to be put to practical use, was hypocritial. Indeed, Marlow welcomed correspondenceand went so far as to reply to a letter from one of his readers, making himself vulnerable to prosecution on the grounds of 'Incitement' to cultivate cannabis.
The case against Mick Marlow was brought following an article in the Worcester Evening Post, which was sent to the local police along with a copy of 'Tricameral Sensimilla', which was (allegedly) described by one Detective Inspector Breeze as "the best book on cannabis growing I have ever read". The trial began in Worcester on Monday 19 February and had been forecast to last three weeks, but once Judge Mott had ruled the bulk of the defence evidence - including approximately 20 similar cannabis grow books - to be inadmissible, it was all over by Friday lunchtime.
Mr Marlow was due to be sentenced on Friday 15 March, but was unable to appear in court because he had been re-arrested the night before by the Gloucestershire Police. Earlier in the evening, they had busted Mick's son for smoking a joint with some friends while sitting in a car pulled off the road and they had come, apparently, to search the son's caravan which was parked nearby. Nonetheless, the police had no compunction in knocking up Mick and his wife, Angie, plus a friend who was staying overnight to provide moral support at court in the morning. They searched the house, found some cannabis plants, and arrested everybody and took them off for questioning. No charges have yet been brought.
Mr Marlow will appeal against his sentence for 'Incitement' and although the judge ordered that the remaining copies of his book be destroyed, 'Tricameral Sensimilla' is likely to be re-published in the Netherlands this summer.
Marlow’s case was the subject of a Guardian editorial on Wednesday the 20th, which said that Judge Mott had brought the law into disrepute. It pointed out that senior customs officers were warning of a heroin glut, yet the police targetted cannabis users. “The lurking suspicion is that, in these times of "Performance Indicators" within the police service, soft drug users make a soft target ... surely a man who reduces the profits of drug dealers should be a hero?”
hemp!

GULF VETERAN ESCAPES JAIL FOR “MINDING” CANNABIS

An unemployed ex-soldier had his sentence for supplying cannabis deferred for a year. Wayne Anderson, 29, from Livingston got into debt with money lenders to buy christmas presents. He was told the debt would be cancelled if he looked after the cannabis. Last March, a search of his home uncovered two kilo slabs of resin hidden under a bed. At Edinburgh High Court, Lord Johnston accepted that Anderson was not a dealer, but warned that he was not being let off. He would be sentenced if he got into further trouble.
Anderson had been awarded campaign medals for service in the Gulf War and Northern Ireland. He saw friends die in both conflicts, and was injured in the Gulf. He had to leave the army in 1993 sufferring from anxiety and depression. Lord Johston said that Anderson’s exemplary army record should be taken into account by the court.
hemp!


Client Side Active Map - Use Text links below if not using HTML 3.0 compatible browser


© 1996 LCCS ~ ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Space and Graphics provided by IN2SOUND